Pratylenchus fallax

 

Contents

 

Rev 06/01/2021

  Classification Hosts
Morphology and Anatomy Life Cycle
Return to Pratylenchus Menu Economic Importance Damage
Distribution Management
Return to Pratylenchidae Menu Feeding  References
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Classification:

        Tylenchina
        Tylenchoidea
         Pratylenchidae
          Pratylenchinae


           Pratylenchus fallax Seinhorst 1968

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Morphology and Anatomy:

 
  • Lip region with three rather flat and obscure annules.
  • Lateral field with four lines and usually additional lines running obliquely between the inner two. Sometimes areolated posterior to phasmid.
  • Tail conical with 16-26 rather narrow annules; tip rounded or shaped slightly irregularly, ranging from renate to almost smooth.

    Ref:: Seinhorst, 1968

Reported median body size for this species (Length mm; width micrometers; weight micrograms) - Click:

 
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Distribution:

Originally reported from The Netherlands, from an apple orcherd with a grass cover.  It is associated with cereals in Britain and in Canada was only found assocaited with grasses (Corbett, 1972; Yu, 2008).

 

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Economic Importance:

 

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Feeding:

    Migratory endoparasite.    

Pratylenchus fallax enters root tips, the root hair dregion and sites of lateral root emergence in wheat, barley and sugar beet. Many individuals penetrate roots at the same site.  Roots of sugarbeet showed more damage and necrosis than those of wheat and barley.  The endodermis became thickened and discolored in response to heavy attack. Lesions in the endodermis became visible in the roots between 4 days and two weeks after nematode penetration.

However, in sterile culture, reproduction of P. fallax was greater in roots of wheat and barley than those of sugar beet (Corbett, 1972).

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Hosts:

 

For an extensive host range list for this species, click


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Life Cycle:

 

Ecophysiological Parameters:

For Ecophysiological Parameters for this species, click If species level data are not available, click for genus level parameters

 

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Damage:

 In wheat, barley and sugarbeet roots, The endodermis became thickened and discolored in response to heavy attack. Lesions in the endodermis became visible in the roots between 4 days and two weeks after nematode penetration (Corbett, 1972).

P. fallax severely damaged the roots of oilseed rape cv. Bienvenu in monoxenic culture. Tap roots were became necrotic and died after 20 days. However, P. fallax did not reproduce well on rape roots. (Webb, 1990).

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Management:

 

Host Plant Resistance, Non-hosts and Crop Rotation alternatives:

For plants reported to have some level of resistance to this species, click

 

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References:

Seinhorst, J.W. 1968. Three New Pratylenchus Species With Α Discussion of the Structure of the Cephalic Framework and of the Spermatheca in This Genus. Nematologica 14:497-510.

Corbett, D.C.M. 1972. The effect of Pratylenchus fallax on wheat barley and sugar beet roots. Nematologica 18:303-308.

Webb, R. M. 1990. Effects of the nematode Pratylenchus fallax on roots of oilseed rape (Brassica napus var. oleifera). Revue De Nematologie 13:115-117.

Yu, Q. 2008.  Species of Pratylenchus (Nematoda: Pratylenchidae) in Canada: description, distribution, and identification. Canadian J. Plant Pathology 30:477-485.

 

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Copyright © 1999 by Howard Ferris.
Revised: June 01, 2021.