Bursaphelenchus mucronatus

 

Contents

 

Rev 11/19/2019

  Classification Hosts
Morphology and Anatomy Life Cycle
Return to Bursaphelenchus Menu Economic Importance Damage
Distribution Management
Return to Aphelenchoididae Menu Feeding  References
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Classification:

Chromadorea
Rhabditida
Tylenchina
Aphelenchoidea
Aphelenchoididae
Bursaphelenchinae
Bursaphelenchinae
Bursaphelenchus mucronatus Mamiya & Enda, 1979
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Morphology and Anatomy:

  Female: .

Female tail has a mucron.

Male: Paired spicules with prominent disc expansions at distal end.

Anterior region

Female gonad with spermatheca and postuterine sac.

 

 Reported median body size for this species (Length mm; width micrometers; weight micrograms) - Click:

Photographs of B. mucronatus provided by Dr. Paulo Vieira, University of Evora, Portugal
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Distribution:

Reported from Canada, Sweden, Finland, Norway, Greece, China and US.

Vectored by Monochamus alternatus in Japan.

Intercepted in June, 1990 in test shipments of logs from Siberia to California.

Occurs in the US (Dwinell, 1997)

Ref:. (Mamiya and Endo, 1979 - Nematologica).

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Economic Importance:

Q-rated pest in California Nematode Pest Rating System.

Recent concerns about plans to import raw lumber from Siberia to mills in California and Oregon - subjected to intensive review - a conflict of different interest groups.

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Feeding:

Nematodes spread through axial and radial resin canals of pine trees, feeding on epithelial cells.

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Hosts:

Pine.

 

For an extensive host range list for this species, click


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Life Cycle:

Ecophysiological Parameters:

For Ecophysiological Parameters for this species, click If species level data are not available, click for genus level parameters

Life cycle similar to that of B. mucronatus.

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Damage:

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Management:

Host Plant Resistance, Non-hosts and Crop Rotation alternatives:

For plants reported to have some level of resistance to this species, click

 

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References:

 
 
Copyright © 1999 by Howard Ferris.
Revised: November 19, 2019.