Pratylenchus coffeae

 

Contents

 

Rev 11/19/2019

  Classification Hosts
Morphology and Anatomy Life Cycle
Return to Pratylenchus Menu Economic Importance Damage
Distribution Management
Return to Pratylenchidae Menu Feeding  References
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Classification:

        Tylenchina
        Tylenchoidea
         Pratylenchidae
          Pratylenchinae
           Pratylenchus coffeae (Zimmermann, 1898) Filipjev & Schuurmans Stekhovem, 1941

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Morphology and Anatomy:

Drawings from CIH Descriptions, 1972

Reported median body size for this species (Length mm; width micrometers; weight micrograms) - Click:

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Distribution:

India; tropics; southeastern US; Central and South America, Caribbean, Zaire.. Prevalence is increasing in Africa during the 21st century.

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Economic Importance:

C-rated pest in California pending current initiatives to have it elevated to an A rating.

The first report of P. coffeae was by Zimmerman in 1898.  He reported that the nematode was responsible for destruction of 95% of the Coffeae arabica plantations in Java.

CDFA Interception Records for Pratylenchus coffeae in California (Courtesy of J. Chitambar, CDFA):

1952 – 1972: Detection of P. coffeae within California is summarized in Siddiqui, Sher, and French (1973). The nematode was found in association with ornamentals, strawberry, cherry, and raspberry plants in 175 Nursery (land or greenhouses), 22 Urban (residential properties, golf courses, parks), and 1 Commercial (cultivated fields and orchards) samples collected throughout the State.

Siddiqui, Sher and French (1973) obtained much of their information from UC Berkeley, UC Riverside and UC Davis nematode distribution records, as well as identificaton records maintained by certain County Agricultural Commissioner offices and the CDFA Nematology Laboratory.

1973 – 1999: P. coffeae was detected in 223 Quarantine samples (originating outside California), 32 Nursery samples (field-grown or greenhouses), 2 Commercial samples (cultivated fields and orchards), and 27 Dooryard/residential samples.

Chronological Detection Records Per Program
(C = commercial, D = Dooryard/residential, N = Nursery, Q = Quarantine)
Year Program County Plant Associate
1973   

 

C = 2 Sonoma, Glenn, Humboldt Apple, Milo, soil
1973   D = 6  Yolo, Ventura, Santa Barbara  
1973   Q = 10    
1974

 

D = 11 Alameda, Fresno, Monterey Ornamentals
1974 Q = 23  

 

 

Sonoma, San Diego, Tulare, San Bernardino soil
1975   

 

D = 3 Kern, Sonoma, Santa Barbara Ornamentals
1975 Q = 11   raspberry, potato, soil
1976 N = 2 San Diego, Sonoma, Stanislaus Ornamental
1976 D = 2    citrus, corn, squash
1976 Q = 24    
1977  N = 1   Santa Barbara Ornamentals
1977 Q = 12    
1978  Q = 5    
1979  N = 6 

 

Contra Costa, Los Angeles Ornamentals, cherry
1979  D = 3 Del, Norte, Tulare  raspberry , soil
1979 Q = 9    
1980 N = 2 Alameda, Fresno, Stanislaus Ornamentals, berries
1980 D = 1    orange
1980 Q = 10    
1981 N = 2  San Diego, Stanislaus Ornamentals
1981 Q = 9    strawberry
1982 Q = 5    
1983 N = 2 Alameda, Merced, Santa Barbara Ornamentals
1983 D = 1   peach, strawberry
1983 Q = 2    
1984

 

 

N = 2 Merced, Ventura Ornamentals
1984 Q = 4   almond
1985 N = 2 Merced, Ventura Ornamentals
  Q = 5   nectarine
1986  Q = 3    
1987  Q = 5    
1988    N = 6 Yolo Grape
1988 Q = 4    
1989 N = 3 Fresno Grape
1989 Q = 7    
1990  Q = 6    
1991    N = 2 San Diego, Tulare Ornamentals
1992 Q = 6    
1993  Q = 10    
1994  Q = 4    
1995  Q = 10    
1996  Q = 9    
1997    N = 1 Riverside Citrus
1997 Q = 8    
1998  N = 1 Santa Barbara Ornamentals
1998  Q = 12    
1999  Q = 4    
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Feeding:

    Migratory endoparasite.     
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Hosts:

Coffee, banana, citrus, and others.

For an extensive host range list for this species, click


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Life Cycle:

Ecophysiological Parameters:

For Ecophysiological Parameters for this species, click If species level data are not available, click for genus level parameters

Males and females present.

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Damage:

Causes death of coffee plants in nurseries.

3 million dollars are lost annually to damage in coffee crops in India.

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Management:

Nematicides are effective; resistant rootstocks available for coffee.

Note: Citrus rootstocks resistant to Radopholus similis in Florida are susceptible to infestation by P. coffeae.

Host Plant Resistance, Non-hosts and Crop Rotation alternatives:

For plants reported to have some level of resistance to this species, click

 

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References:

CIH Descriptions of Plant-parasitic Nematodes 1:6 (1972).

Siddiqui, Sher, and French (1973)

Lordello, L.G.E. 1986  Plant-parasitic nematodes that attack coffee. Pp 33-41 in Anon.  Plant-parasitic nematodes of bananas, citrus, coffee, grapes and tobacco. Union Carbide Corp.

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Copyright © 1999 by Howard Ferris.
Revised: November 19, 2019.